Brookgreen Gardens

Mr. McB and I spent Christmas at Myrtle Beach. It was the first time I have ever visited the beach in the winter but I definitely plan to do so again.
Archer and Anna Hyatt Huntington statueDespite many visits to the Myrtle Beach area, this trip marked my first visit to Brookgreen Gardens in Murrells Inlet. The gardens occupy land that once made up several rice plantations. The land was purchased by Archer and Anna Hyatt Huntington in 1930. The southern location was good for Anna’s health and the makeup of the gardens was the perfect place to display her sculptures. As time went on the Huntington’s broadened their vision to include pieces from other artists and now the garden is the largest collection of American sculpture in the world and the largest outdoor sculpture collection in the U.S.

The pieces are varied just like the land that comprises the gardens. It’s clear that the Huntington’s put a great deal of thought into the best way to integrate the art into the landscape.

bg_aligatorI highly recommend seeing the gardens if you get the chance. The tickets are reasonable and are good for several days. If you are visiting the area in the heat of the summer, multiple visits may be your best choice for seeing everything. As it was, we walked for at least eight miles and still didn’t see every single piece.

See the photos below to get a taste of what you could see during a visit to Brookgreen.

bg_arrowThe wall divides the more manicured gardens from the natural area near the tidal river that runs through the gardens.

Black Panther statueBlack Panther

bg_brownlady

children's garden at brookgreenThe children’s garden is full of whimsy and color.

naked woman sculpture

sculpture set amongst the treesA great example of how the sculptures fit into the landscape.

white bloomSome blooms even in December

treesCandles left from the Night of 1,000 Candles holiday display

Time and the Fates of ManTime and the Fates of Man

Don QuixoteDon Quixote – Anna Hyatt Huntington

bg_falloffranceFall of France – One of my favorites
This piece depicts France’s fate in WWII.

frog babyFrog Baby in the children’s garden

bg_inspirationPegasus

musesMuses

bg_pepperbg_redbirdCardinal bg_seahorseSeahorse (reminds me of Mooseal from the Wuzzles)

bg_songofmyselfSong of Myself – one of many quotes and verses in the gardens

bg_foxThis fox lives in the zoo that is on the property.

bg_cowSo do these cows.

It’s a great place and again, one that I highly recommend.

Photowalk – University of South Carolina

I must admit, it’s been a crazy month since I’ve started my job. I’ve fallen behind on a few things, like keeping every baseboard in my house dust-free, trying every new thing on Pinterest and blogging. I am committed to managing my time a bit better and staying on top of this blog, even if it means letting a bit of dust accumulate on the baseboards.

The photos in this post were taken at the University of South Carolina on Good Friday. Enjoy!

University of South Carolinaveterans memorialThis is adjacent to the World War Memorial on campus. When the building was constructed in the 1930s, it was believed that there would never be another World War. The building now houses University Publications.

Brick walls and palmettos

The Memorial Fountain (aka three-dish fountain) in the Caroliniana Garden was sporting garnet and black when I visited. The fountain is a memorial to South Carolina’s patriots who served in the Revolutionary War.

horseshoeThis photo looks onto The Horseshoe, the oldest part of the campus dating back to 1805. The monument seen in the distance is in memory of Rev. Maxcy, the first president of the then South Carolina College. Yeah, it’s a lot different from The Horseshoe, I’m used to talking about.

pineappleThe pineapple has long been associated with hospitality so it’s fitting that this one greets visitors at the Memorial Rose Garden.

fountainLooking toward the Thomas Cooper Library

torch bearer

The “Torchbearer” was donated to the university in 1965 by sculptress Anna Hyatt Huntington.

The campus was really lovely. I enjoyed the big, shady trees and old buildings.